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Granite Falls Advocate Tribune - Granite Falls, MN
  • Bevy of new businesses coming soon to main street Granite Falls

  • The Prentice Street storefronts are filling up fast.At the recommendation of the EDA, on Monday the Granite Falls City Council approved a financing package that will bring a bevy of new businesses, from one single family, into the former Du-Mart building.“We’re pretty excited about it,” said Steve Li...
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  • The Prentice Street storefronts are filling up fast.
    At the recommendation of the EDA, on Monday the Granite Falls City Council approved a financing package that will bring a bevy of new businesses, from one single family, into the former Du-Mart building.
    “We’re pretty excited about it,” said Steve Lindquist at Monday’s city council meeting. “It’s a chance to consolidate. It’s almost like a mini-mall.”
    Steve and wife, Carolyn, have owned and operated an electronic repair shop and travel agency, Travel Now and TV Unlimited, for over thirty years out of Renville but will be brininging the services to Granite Falls largely to accommodate the business aspirations of their daughter, Heather, who will be selling books and establishing a commercial quilting and sewing operation/shop.
    “We decided to bring Heather into the mix and she’s got, I think, 12,000 books, conservatively––so we needed the space,” Steve said. “That pretty much spurred it.”
    The Lindquists have resided roughly three miles outside of Granite Falls for over 50 years. In addition to the business, Steve also works in the Maintenance Department of Project Turnabout. They have one other daughter Dr. Heidi Ramsdell, who works as a physical therapists in Duluth.
    Financing for the venture includes $125,000 in financing from the Granite Falls Bank, $76,800 in financing from the EDA’s 811 Revolving Loan Fund and a $ 5,000 forgivable loan from the EDA’s 241 Account. Terms of the $76,800 loan are three percent interest for 10 years.
    According to EDA documents, $26,000 will be used for building repairs and maintenance, $36,000 is for a longarm quilting machine and $90,000 is for inventory for the quilting process and sewing shop.
    “We’re excited about pulling the three or four or five business all into one. We’re a work in progress and we’re open to any comments, questions, concerns or suggestions if people are wanting any particular items,” said Steve. “Our main concern is customer service. That’s what made our business survive for the past 30 years.”
    Steve said the family plans to be open for business by November 1 with a Grand Opening likely in January.

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