This is a first. I spent the late morning with Cousin Tina at Toys-R-Us in Scottsdale buying gifts (which Tina will wrap) for five people as a part of a program through the state of Arizona which identifies wards of the state who have no relatives, no connections, and, in the case of these five, are stricken with cerebral palsy. On the way to the store, Tina read their stories and their requests for gifts. Can you imagine, in this day and age, a couple of the requests were for...a blanket. It makes me want to cry to think about it. After Tina wraps the gifts, we will deliver them on Tuesday. I look forward to it. But oh my, here we have such human suffering under our nose, and we're driving around in our cars whining and moaning about traffic. 


These people exist, and they exist, in part, to offer us the chance to serve "the least of them." When faced with such suffering and sadness, the impulse is to turn away. We must face the suffering, and then reap the rewards which follow, which include the unwelcome but obvious conclusion that only in continually facing and alleviating human suffering do we find meaning. 


Frankly, I hope buying a few toys will do it for the year, but I know that ain't true.


 


This is a first. I spent the late morning with Cousin Tina at Toys-R-Us in Scottsdale buying gifts (which Tina will wrap) for five people as a part of a program through the state of Arizona which identifies wards of the state who have no relatives, no connections, and, in the case of these five, are stricken with cerebral palsy. On the way to the store, Tina read their stories and their requests for gifts. Can you imagine, in this day and age, a couple of the requests were for...a blanket. It makes me want to cry to think about it. After Tina wraps the gifts, we will deliver them on Tuesday. I look forward to it. But oh my, here we have such human suffering under our nose, and we're driving around in our cars whining and moaning about traffic. 


These people exist, and they exist, in part, to offer us the chance to serve "the least of them." When faced with such suffering and sadness, the impulse is to turn away. We must face the suffering, and then reap the rewards which follow, which include the unwelcome but obvious conclusion that only in continually facing and alleviating human suffering do we find meaning. 


Frankly, I hope buying a few toys will do it for the year, but I know that ain't true.