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Granite Falls Advocate Tribune
  • GF residents see flood insurance reduction

  • Granite Falls residents and businesses located within the 500 year flood plain, are set to receive a discount on future flood insurance premiums as a result of the city’s successful submission of a National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Community Rating System (CRS) application.“It’s a good benefit that...
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  • Granite Falls residents and businesses located within the 500 year flood plain, are set to receive a discount on future flood insurance premiums as a result of the city’s successful submission of a National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Community Rating System (CRS) application.
    “It’s a good benefit that we’re able to obtain on behalf of the residents of Granite Falls, said EDA Director Dennis Van Hoof.
    At the direction of the city council, Van Hoof has spent the last two years jumping through the hoops required to complete the application, which only became a viable option as a result of the city’s instituting a nearly completed, flood mitigation plan over the past 12 years.
    Van Hoof said that the application provided an opportunity for Granite Falls to present its flood mitigation activities in an effort to meet (NFIP) criteria and improves the city’s CRS Class rating, providing property owners with an associated reduction in insurance rates.
    “It allows for people who have a home or a business within the 100 year flood plain, when they apply for flood insurance with a local agent, to receive a 25 percent discount on the premium. If they’re outside of the 100 year flood plain but in the 500 year flood plain area, they will receive a 10 percent discount,” Van Hoof said.
    At this point, all of the properties that would have fallen within the 100 year flood plain are said to have been removed by the city as a component of its flood mitigation plan. The 500 year flood plain, however, extends over much of the city. It is depicted in the accompanying map.
    Van Hoof said that a letter would be sent to local insurance providers notifying them of the change, which retroactively became effective May 1 of this year. As such, property owners should not have to do anything out of the ordinary when purchasing flood insurance.
    “I commend you on your community actions and your determination to lead your community to be more disaster resistant,” said Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration Associate Administrator David Miller, in a letter received by the city in July. “This commitment enhances public safety, protects property, preserves the natural functions of floodplains, and reduces flood insurance premiums.

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