Met with an experienced campaign manager today for an hour. I learned a great deal about the nuts and bolts of a small, local campaign such as this run for the Minnesota House. Signs. Door-knocking. Printing. Color themes. Web site. Fundraising. All things which must be decided. A political campaign is sort of like running a business with yourself as the product. 


To keep sane, I will have to frequently stop, breathe, and remember why I am running. First, to protect and improve rural eldercare. Second, to improve rural schools. Third, to advance the transportation interests of Northwestern Minnesota. 


But to get to that point, I have to find about 800 4' lengths of rebar to hold signs. You have to have solid signs or they blow all over and look flimsy. Somebody who has flimsy signs--well, how in the world could somebody with flimsy signs hope to get anything done about nursing homes? 


I have been watching the Minnesota legislature with more interest than usual. Minnpost has the best in-depth coverage of the nuts and bolts. The bonding bill is taking up the attention right now. From the outside, that negotiation looks like a most unpleasant tit-for-tat affair, with project pitted against project. How do you decide if a new classroom building in Thief River Falls is more important than a parking ramp in St. Cloud? Or should the state back bonds for either one? 


There are priority lists, but in the end there is a lot of horse-trading, I am sure. One legislator told me he had a project a few years ago that he wanted for his district, but was told that it was not high priority. In fact, it was way, way down the list below the cut-off. But he kept bringing it up every now and then, just in case. Sure enough, on the last day before the vote, his project got included in the bill as a part of a negotiation trade-off. He was as surprised as anybody. 




Met with an experienced campaign manager today for an hour. I learned a great deal about the nuts and bolts of a small, local campaign such as this run for the Minnesota House. Signs. Door-knocking. Printing. Color themes. Web site. Fundraising. All things which must be decided. A political campaign is sort of like running a business with yourself as the product. 

To keep sane, I will have to frequently stop, breathe, and remember why I am running. First, to protect and improve rural eldercare. Second, to improve rural schools. Third, to advance the transportation interests of Northwestern Minnesota. 

But to get to that point, I have to find about 800 4' lengths of rebar to hold signs. You have to have solid signs or they blow all over and look flimsy. Somebody who has flimsy signs--well, how in the world could somebody with flimsy signs hope to get anything done about nursing homes? 

I have been watching the Minnesota legislature with more interest than usual. Minnpost has the best in-depth coverage of the nuts and bolts. The bonding bill is taking up the attention right now. From the outside, that negotiation looks like a most unpleasant tit-for-tat affair, with project pitted against project. How do you decide if a new classroom building in Thief River Falls is more important than a parking ramp in St. Cloud? Or should the state back bonds for either one? 

There are priority lists, but in the end there is a lot of horse-trading, I am sure. One legislator told me he had a project a few years ago that he wanted for his district, but was told that it was not high priority. In fact, it was way, way down the list below the cut-off. But he kept bringing it up every now and then, just in case. Sure enough, on the last day before the vote, his project got included in the bill as a part of a negotiation trade-off. He was as surprised as anybody.