|
|
Granite Falls Advocate Tribune - Granite Falls, MN
Anyone who knows Eric knows that he writes about a little bit of everything, whether it's taking a trip down memory lane, or praising and/or criticizing something or someone.
Nuts and bolts
email print
About this blog
By Eric Bergeson
Since 1997, Eric has owned and operated Bergeson Nursery, rural Fertile, MN, a business his grandfather started in 1937. With the active participation of his parents, who owned the business for the previous twenty five years, and his younger brother ...
X
Eric Bergeson's The Country Scribe
Since 1997, Eric has owned and operated Bergeson Nursery, rural Fertile, MN, a business his grandfather started in 1937. With the active participation of his parents, who owned the business for the previous twenty five years, and his younger brother Joe, who is now president of the company, the business has nearly tripled in size during Eric’s ownership tenure. The holder of a Master of Arts in History from the University of North Dakota, Eric has taught courses in history and political science at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. He is also an adjunct lecturer in history for Hamline University, St. Paul, MN. Eric’s hobbies include Minnesota Twins baseball, Bach organ music, bookstores, hiking, photography, singing old country music with his brother Joe, and watching the wildlife on the swamp in front of his house eight miles outside of Fertile, Minn.
Recent Posts
Sept. 29, 2014 12:01 a.m.
Sept. 29, 2014 12:01 a.m.
Sept. 19, 2014 12:01 a.m.
Sept. 15, 2014 11:35 a.m.
Sept. 14, 2014 12:01 a.m.
May 8, 2014 12:01 a.m.



Met with an experienced campaign manager today for an hour. I learned a great deal about the nuts and bolts of a small, local campaign such as this run for the Minnesota House. Signs. Door-knocking. Printing. Color themes. Web site. Fundraising. All things which must be decided. A political campaign is sort of like running a business with yourself as the product. 

To keep sane, I will have to frequently stop, breathe, and remember why I am running. First, to protect and improve rural eldercare. Second, to improve rural schools. Third, to advance the transportation interests of Northwestern Minnesota. 

But to get to that point, I have to find about 800 4' lengths of rebar to hold signs. You have to have solid signs or they blow all over and look flimsy. Somebody who has flimsy signs--well, how in the world could somebody with flimsy signs hope to get anything done about nursing homes? 

I have been watching the Minnesota legislature with more interest than usual. Minnpost has the best in-depth coverage of the nuts and bolts. The bonding bill is taking up the attention right now. From the outside, that negotiation looks like a most unpleasant tit-for-tat affair, with project pitted against project. How do you decide if a new classroom building in Thief River Falls is more important than a parking ramp in St. Cloud? Or should the state back bonds for either one? 

There are priority lists, but in the end there is a lot of horse-trading, I am sure. One legislator told me he had a project a few years ago that he wanted for his district, but was told that it was not high priority. In fact, it was way, way down the list below the cut-off. But he kept bringing it up every now and then, just in case. Sure enough, on the last day before the vote, his project got included in the bill as a part of a negotiation trade-off. He was as surprised as anybody. 

 

 

Recent Posts

    latest blogs

    • Community
    • National