The Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas (JCRC) is proud to partner with the Fagen Fighters WWII Museum on Saturday, May 21, to present “The Holocaust Boxcar Exhibit” and “Transfer of Memory.”

The Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas (JCRC) is proud to partner with the Fagen Fighters WWII Museum on Saturday, May 21, to present “The Holocaust Boxcar Exhibit” and “Transfer of Memory.”

“The Holocaust Boxcar Exhibit” includes a rail car used in the deportation of Jews from Germany and German-occupied Europe to the killing centers in occupied Poland. The Germans attempted to disguise their deadly intentions, referring to these deportations as “resettlement to the east.”  The boxcar exhibited at the Fagen Fighters WWII Museum was purchased from Georgenthal, Germany.

 “Transfer of Memory” is a photo exhibition illustrating Holocaust survivors living in Minnesota, in their homes, in full color.

Each Holocaust survivor in “Transfer of Memory” shares a story of survival during exceedingly difficult circumstances, yet as a collection, these images focus on life and hope. From Europe to Minnesota, it was here they fashioned their dreams, their futures, and their families – their lives are a constant reminder of the value of freedom and the enduring human spirit. Photographer David Sherman and writer Lili Chester, in partnership with the Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas, created this photography exhibition.  Visit www.transferofmemory.org for more information.

Guest speakers include: Judy Baron, Holocaust survivor; Steve Hunegs, executive director of the Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas; and Dr. Joachim “Yogi” Reppmann, German historian.

Judy Baron began the war in Hungary.  Judy, along with her mother and two sisters, were also sent to Auschwitz and from there they worked in slave labor camps where both her mother and one sister died.  Judy and her sister were finally transported to Bergen Belsen.

When British and Canadian troops entered in 1945 they found thousands of bodies unburied and approximately 55,000 inmates just barely alive. Typhus and starvation were so pervasive that about one third of the inmates died after liberation. Among those was Judy’s sister who died just one week after the British entered the camp. Judy was in such critical condition that she was transported to an emergency hospital in Sweden. It was during their recovery in Sweden that Fred Baron (Judy’s late husband) met Judy and they began to live again.

Judy Baron stated, “In 1947 some friends helped me come to the United States. I stayed on the East Coast for about half a year and was on the verge of going back to Sweden when somebody told me, ‘What you see here is not really the United States.’ I found out there are Scandinavians in Minnesota, and I figured if they could stand the cold, maybe I could too!”

“The Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas extends great thanks to Ron and Diane Fagen.  We are grateful to the Fagens and the museum for creating the World War II Boxcar Exhibit with its rolling stock, tableau, photographs, and storyboard providing an overview of the Shoah (Holocaust).  We thank the Fagens for their generosity of spirit and resources in bringing the exhibit to Granite Falls and for the first time to western Minnesota.  We invite the Granite Falls and surrounding communities to participate in these important exhibitions,” added Steve Hunegs, Executive Director of the JCRC.

For more information, visit: www.fagenfighterswwiimuseum.org.  
 
The JCRC… the public affairs voice of the Jewish community fighting anti-Semitism and prejudice, promoting tolerance and social justice, and representing Jews, individually and collectively, here and abroad.