Two things about the headline above: 1. On the outside chance that some readers are not familiar with his name, I should note that Robert Mueller is the so-called special counsel, the head guy, in the federal investigation of possible Russian meddling in last year's presidential election. 2. My eagerness — “please hurry” — […]

 

Two things about the headline above:

1. On the outside chance that some readers are not familiar with his name, I should note that Robert Mueller is the so-called special counsel, the head guy, in the federal investigation of possible Russian meddling in last year's presidential election.

2. My eagerness — “please hurry” — does not mean that I want Mueller to be anything less than thorough and fair  in his probe. It's just that widespread public disgust with the Trump administration is taking an increasingly terrible toll on the national spirit. The sooner the feds can bring justice to bear in this situation, the better.

No, I  can't say with certainty that even a single soul  on the Trump  team  has violated the law with regard to the Russian matter. But, as a betting man, I'm more than willing to wager or farthing or two on the likelihood that crimes were committed and that prosecutions will be pursued.

In a sense, I'm reminded of the nation's huge sigh of relief when Richard Nixon finally  resigned the presidency in August, 1974, amid the Watergate Scandal. Scads of top officials in the Nixon administration, including former Attorney General John Mitchell, were prosecuted and packed off to jail.

Had Nixon preferred, he could have mounted a vigorous legal defense against the charges he faced and resisted the move toward impeachment in the U.S. House. But he summoned, instead, the last remaining shred of class in his character and quit the job to which he was twice elected.

Would Donald Trump ever do anything like that?   I somehow doubt it. Anything requiring him to admit even a semblance of guilt seems to be profoundly at odds with his narcissism.

That's another reason why so many of us are so depressed. If Trump is genuinely a madman, he's also less likely to be as graceful — if that's the word for it — as Nixon was when he finally bowed out.

I suspect that the sentiments I'm expressing here are not completely unlike thoughts that have crossed the minds of certain Republicans in Congress. Most GOP lawmakers seem reluctant to say what they really think of Trump, lest they arouse the ire of The Donald's political base. A few of them, however, have reached the breaking point. Republican Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee has bravely declared that Trump is ill-suited to the presidency.

Corker is right, of course, but we need far more than such sentiments to rid our body politic of the poison represented by Donald Trump. A conscience-stricken Republican politician here or there just won't do.

What we need is Robert Mueller and his posse to come thundering down Pennsylvania Avenue waving legal documents that will bring relief from the political funk that now plagues us.