Donald Trump has been president for more than nine months now, and to hear him tell it, he's the best one America has ever had. By now, you're probably familiar with Trump's incessant boasting that he's a man of unlimited talents, boundless intellect, unprecedented popularity and more political moxie than all his presidential predecessors […]

 

Donald Trump has been president for more than nine months now, and to hear him tell it, he's the best one America has ever had.

By now, you're probably familiar with Trump's incessant boasting that he's a man of unlimited talents, boundless intellect, unprecedented popularity and more political moxie than all his presidential predecessors put together. The truly scary aspect of all this is that The Donald seems to actually believe every word of it — even when the best available evidence contradicts him.

One of my favorite examples of Trump's penchant for rejecting the truth arose when he insisted that the crowds at his inauguration were larger than those at any previous such event. In truth, the audience at Barack Obama's inauguration eight years earlier was considerably larger than the crowd Trump attracted. Photographic evidence was indisputable. But Trump wanted his doings to have been bigger and better, and that settled the matter, as far as the new president saw it.  And that was the story he ordered his minions to tell. Reality was irrelevant. He was laying down a policy whereby the new president is presumed to be right about everything.

Another good example is Trump's insistence that he got at least as many popular votes as Hillary Clinton attracted. Actually, he received nearly 3 million fewer votes than his Democratic rival. But he said the official tally was wrong because it failed to take into account the many illegitimate ballots cast by political rascals.

State and local election officials, more than a few of whom are Republicans,   put the lie to Trump's bogus claim of widespread voter fraud. Trump responded by appointing a special panel to study the matter. No news yet on what the group has uncovered.

The most troubling question to arise from all of this is whether Trump has convinced himself to believe what he wants to believe, no matter what the evidence says. I wouldn't doubt  that he could pass a lie-detector test with answers that only he believes.

This kind of self-delusion has become so routine in Trump's political patter that we've almost come to expect it. It behooves us to double-check everything he says. Yeah, we're supposed to do that with every president, but this guy is a special   case. As the old joke goes, you know he's lying when you see his lips moving.

Yes, Trump's penchant for self-aggrandizement would be mostly funny if it weren't for  the kind of disaster it invites. One of these days, the man is going to fool himself into a political crisis he didn't see coming. It might well be a situation for which the president can't blame the Democrats — at least not with any credibility.