On Monday night the KCC kicked off its 10th annual health challenge with a presentation from Marcus McCleary, who runs Move-15.com. He walked the audience through an emotional journey. He grew up ignorant about health and nutrition. The word fat was forbidden in his household. His family ignored their health problems. Despite growing up skinny, the habits caught up to him as his life got more sedentary. He lived in denial of his condition for a long time – after all, he was a former athlete. He was still the strong guy, helping when someone needed something moved, and he was really good at golf.

On Monday night the KCC kicked off its 10th annual health challenge with a presentation from Marcus McCleary, who runs Move-15.com. He walked the audience through an emotional journey. He grew up ignorant about health and nutrition. The word fat was forbidden in his household. His family ignored their health problems. Despite growing up skinny, the habits caught up to him as his life got more sedentary. He lived in denial of his condition for a long time – after all, he was a former athlete. He was still the strong guy, helping when someone needed something moved, and he was really good at golf.

After a heart surgery, the surgeon told him to move for 15 minutes a day. That seemed simple enough, but even that got continually pushed off to everyone's favorite word – “tomorrow.” He went to a dark place emotionally. Things got so bad, he asked his wife for a divorce, because he wasn't being fair to her.

He hit a breaking point at 2:00 in the morning, after sneaking a bag a chips and watching TV to escape his haunting thoughts. He went to the mirror, staring at himself, shirtless and palms up. That's when he said, “I'm ready.” He started doing the 15 minutes, and gradually more as the pounds fell off. He moved to different activities, eventually doing a triathlon of running, biking, and kayaking.He is now a muscular 205, and runs bootcamps and trains people out of his home.

His presentation covered some less known aspects of a fitness journey. People often need to reach a breaking point, some moment of crisis or embarrassment that finally cements in them the desire to make a change. Even after that point, there are many, many, many traps. All the habits that got a person to that point have to be filtered through.

People want to go with extremes. 2 hour workouts every day. Eating 800 calories of just salad. That approach doesn't work. Health is a lifelong process. People need to find a way to make progress towards their health goals with out letting fitness consume their life.

The way McCleary put it, there are a lot of roads that lead to the destination. People should do what they can for their level. This takes self-awareness. There are people who have been doing the same routine for years. Lift the same weight, run at the same pace, eat the same food, and they end up looking the same.

His emphasis for success was "the power over me." You need to be a leader to yourself. You need to be a light. Tell yourself "I'm proud of you. You're beautiful." . Love starts in the mirror. He talked about the need to continually update - the body, the routine. Keep moving, keep growing, keep changing. What are your incentives? We only get one body.