Scott Mauch of Prairie Grain Partners came to the council to discuss construction on a new grain storage project. They are also looking at expanding their fertilizer building. There is a problem, the sanitary sewer that would be under the building in the industrial park needs to be moved. Mauch plans to have the company cover the engineering assessment costs. The estimated cost is $214,000, and he asked the council to cover half of that.

The rationale for the city helping cover the cost is the expansion will significantly increase the tax base, the amount of taxes the city will be able to collect. Since the company started, they have grown from paying $40-50,000 to over $400,000 in taxes annually. This grain storage expansion will likely add another $40-70,000, so the investments the company have been making have been a big benefit to the city as well.

The city of Clarkfield and Prairie Grain Partners have had a good working relationship for years. One example is they worked together with the city to bury the storm sewer. Prairie Grain Partners prides itself on trying to be good neighbors and cleaning up after themselves from their work.

Mauch asked the city for $107,000 to help move the sanitary sewer. The council agreed unanimously. The money will come from the general fund. The motion included a 70/30 split, so 70% of the tax revenue will go to replenishing the general fund, which will take 2-3 years to fully replenish, and the other 30% will be available to spend as the city sees fit. In other news: The Clarkfield pool will open June 10th. Jeremiah Ian from the Clarkfield Lions Club came to the council to have them sign off on paperwork for the state to grant them a one day gambling license. This will allow them to hold a raffle as part of the Clarkfield Cardinal Days celebration. A few potential people who had previously expressed interest in running the Clarkfield Cafe dropped out of consideration. The H. A. Haag Task Force is looking into grant writing options to help cover costs of the work that needs to be done on the school. The fire department is working on changing over their pager system to 800 mega-hertz. They are working on trying to get a county or region wide grants to help everyone switch over at once, since the devices are expensive.

The rationale for the city helping cover the cost is the expansion will significantly increase the tax base, the amount of taxes the city will be able to collect. Since the company started, they have grown from paying $40-50,000 to over $400,000 in taxes annually. This grain storage expansion will likely add another $40-70,000, so the investments the company have been making have been a big benefit to the city as well. The city of Clarkfield and Prairie Grain Partners have had a good working relationship for years. One example is they worked together with the city to bury the storm sewer. Prairie Grain Partners prides itself on trying to be good neighbors and cleaning up after themselves from their work. Mauch asked the city for $107,000 to help move the sanitary sewer. The council agreed unanimously. The money will come from the general fund. The motion included a 70/30 split, so 70% of the tax revenue will go to replenishing the general fund, which will take 2-3 years to fully replenish, and the other 30% will be available to spend as the city sees fit.

In other news: The Clarkfield pool will open June 10th. Jeremiah Ian from the Clarkfield Lions Club came to the council to have them sign off on paperwork for the state to grant them a one day gambling license. This will allow them to hold a raffle as part of the Clarkfield Cardinal Days celebration. A few potential people who had previously expressed interest in running the Clarkfield Cafe dropped out of consideration. The H. A. Haag Task Force is looking into grant writing options to help cover costs of the work that needs to be done on the school. The fire department is working on changing over their pager system to 800 mega-hertz. They are working on trying to get a county or region wide grants to help everyone switch over at once, since the devices are expensive.